Groupios-folderShape
Rachel Illingworth

“A watched pot never boils” is an ancient proverb that has never let me down, especially when cooking. But I recently figured out a loophole for this trusted Chinese proverb — marketing to informed customers. In today’s world, your customers’ needs change on a daily basis. To deliver a lasting Customer Experience (CX), you’ve got to constantly go back to your pot and test the water temperature — or measure your customer data frequently.

Value of metrics

To put it in perspective, leading companies who actively set aside a CX budget also tend to keep an eye on customer metrics — and it pays off in profit. Don’t oversimplify. Instead of basing your campaign’s success on the number of customers buying your product— be adventurous and base report data on the quality of your customers.

Business leaders should already be thinking about how the value of the product might change throughout the customer life cycle. The best way to get an understanding of your metric values is to ask these three CX questions, provided by Forrester Research:

  1. How good is your company’s CX?
  2. Why is the CX quality what it is?
  3. What should a company do to improve their CX?

Never stop measuring NPS

One of the best ways to measure customer satisfaction is with the Net Promoter System, which uses Net Promoter Scores (NPS) to survey and examine customer relationships. NPS surveys are used to determine whether or not customers would recommend your business to their friends or family. As Forrester explains, “The score is calculated by subtracting the percentage of detractors from the percentage of promoters — hence the Net aspect. It is a best practice to couple the NPS question with a follow-up question that asks customers why they gave a certain rating.” Business leaders can use metrics like NPS to determine a plan of action for their teams and implement critical changes to the current CX.

Measure that customer data

Even with the assistance of NPS, you’ll still need to keep your finger on the pulse of customer metrics through other insight tools, like Salesforce Wave Analytics. Here are a list of other metrics you should keep an eye on when trying to improve CX:

  • Response time — Was your customer helped quickly and succinctly?
  • Problem resolution time — How long did the customer representative take to help them find a solution to their problem?
  • Contact volume by channel — How often are you touching base with the customer?
  • Response time — Was your customer helped quickly and succinctly?
  • Problem resolution time — How long did the customer representative take to help them find a solution to their problem?
  • Contact volume by channel — How often are you touching base with the customer?
  • Post-incident surveys by channel — Was their experience with the customer representative satisfactory?
  • Self-service and/or community experience — How can you make the site or its content more useful?
  • Relationship surveys — How satisfied are customers overall, on a semi-regular basis?
  • Customer loyalty — Would you talk about this product or service with your friends or family?
  • Overall CX rating.

Keeping up with the metrics

In the end, never stop using metrics to understand where your audience is approaching your brand from. And be open to adjust your marketing tactics based on new customer insights and trending channels, and regularly make budget and strategy goal adjustments. Keep in mind that modifications should occur only to improve the life cycle and product value to the customer.

 

Join the Conversation

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

close-link
close-link
Subscribe to our blogs

close-link
Subscribe to our blogs